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Nicola Wardrop (previously Batchelor) is a Senior Research Fellow working in the Geography and the Environment Academic Unit of the University of Southampton, funded by an MRC Population Health Scientist fellowship. Nicola's main research focus is the use of epidemiological data, environmental data and spatial statistics to investigate neglected zoonotic diseases in Africa.

Nicola's research interests include the application of GIS, mapping, spatial analysis and geostatistical modelling to infectious disease distributions. She is particularly interested in their application to neglected tropical diseases, zoonoses and vector borne diseases. Her recent research has focused on human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Uganda and scrub typhus in Taiwan.

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  • Recents posts on my research, spatial epidemiology, neglected diseases and the world of academia more generally!
  • 2013 Publications. It was a good year for publications in 2013, so here are a few highlights!  Wardrop, NA., Fèvre, EM., Atkinson, P.M. & Welburn, S. (2013) The dispersal ecology of Rhodesian sleeping sickness following its introduction to a new area. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 7 (10) e2485.Tsetse-transmitted human and animal trypanosomiasis are constraints to both human and animal health in sub-Saharan Africa, and although these diseases have been known for over a century, there is little recent evidence demonstrating how the parasites circulate in natural hosts and ecosystems. The spread of Rhodesian sleeping sickness (caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) within Uganda over the past 15 years has been linked to the movement of infected, untreated livestock (the predominant ...
    Posted Jan 30, 2014, 3:29 AM by Nicola Wardrop
  • **APPLICATIONS CLOSED**PhD Topic: Spatial epidemiology of infectious diseases in East Africa Funding not guaranteed, but there is the opportunity to obtain funding from the University of Southampton via a competitive process.Project Description Infectious diseases, including zoonotic diseases (those which transmit from animals to humans) cause a considerable burden in developing countries in terms of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, loss of productivity and economic losses. Many infectious diseases exhibit strong correlations with environmental factors (e.g. land cover, precipitation), and spatial analyses and modelling can be used to provide further understanding of disease epidemiology, supporting disease control programmes. This PhD project will make use of a comprehensive and unique dataset to provide further understanding of the spatial epidemiology of infectious diseases in East Africa. The PhD student will ...
    Posted Jan 30, 2014, 3:25 AM by Nicola Wardrop
  • **APPLICATIONS CLOSED**PhD topic: The spatial epidemiology of podoconiosis and irritant soils in Ethiopia and Cameroon. Funding not guaranteed, but there is the opportunity to obtain funding from the University of Southampton via a competitive process.Project Description Podoconiosis (non-infectious elephantiasis) causes major swelling to the foot and lower limbs of affected individuals, occurring in subsistence farming communities in highland areas of tropical Africa, Central America and north-west India. The disease is believed to affect between 5 and 10% of the population in some areas, contributing substantial morbidity and resulting in significant productivity loss and the stigmatisation of affected individuals. Although the precise mechanism of disease development is not fully understand, previous research has identified contact with irritant particles in volcanic soils as responsible for disease development. However, the specific soil components which result ...
    Posted Jan 30, 2014, 3:25 AM by Nicola Wardrop
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